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Oregon River Fish Report

 OR Department of Fish & Wildlife Staff
(503) 947-6000
9/20/17
Website

 

Smith River Fishing Report

Trout fishing closes Sept. 15 in the mainstem and tributaries. Chinook fishing in the lower Smith should be decent as more fish move into the system but reports have indicated pretty slow fishing thus far. There is no Chinook fishing allowed above the confluence with Spencer Creek in the mainstem Smith nor above Johnson Creek in the North Fork Smith.

Applegate River Fishing Report

The Applegate River is open for trout fishing. Two hatchery trout may be harvested per day. Wild trout must be released unharmed. For the most current information on releases of water out of Applegate Reservoir, call 1-800-472-2434.

Siletz River Fishing Report

The Siletz River opened for fall Chinook on Aug. 1 and with the rain early this week fishing is starting to pick up in tidewater.

Anglers are reminded the two-rod validation is only valid while angling in standing water bodies excluding coastal lakes with wild coho seasons. Two rods are prohibited on all coastal rivers, tidewater, estuaries and bays.

Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Remember the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

Nestucca River Fishing Report

Fall Chinook season is open on Tillamook River and Bay. Fishing on the bay has been moderate with a few fish being caught at the mouth, and up in the estuary. Trolling herring or spinners, bobber fishing bait, or casting spinners are all good techniques. The river just opened above Cloverdale Bridge on the 16th, and we haven’t had many reports yet, but with recent rains there should be a few fish sneaking into the lower River. Bobber fishing bait, Back-bouncing, back-trolling plugs or divers and bait, or casting spinners can all be effective methods. Anglers are reminded that the Nestucca is closed to all salmon angling above First Bridge (near Beaver) Aug. 1 to Dec. 31, and that there is NO wild coho retention in the rivers and bays this year. Also, two rods are prohibited on all coastal rivers, tidewater, estuaries and bays.

Summer steelhead fishing has been moderate to slow, but there are fish throughout the system. September can be a great time to target these fish as cooler nights and recent rains lower water temps, and fish that have been holding get more active. Fish are throughout the system. Target riffles and the top of pools during first and last light, and concentrate on deeper holding pools once the sun is on the water. Fishing stealthy, with light gear, and targeting first and last light is often the key to success with these fish.

Trout season is open, and recent surveys by ODFW found good numbers of cutthroat in the basin, and sea run cutthroat are entering the lower River now, too. Remember the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

Three Rivers is closed to all angling downstream of the hatchery through Sept. 30.

Trask River Fishing Report

Fall Chinook fishing opened on the Trask River Sept. 16. We haven’t had many reports yet, but with the recent rains, there are probably a few fish sneaking in; both Chinook and hatchery coho. Bobber fishing bait, back-bouncing, back-trolling plugs or divers and bait, or casting spinners can all be effective methods.

Anglers are reminded that the dam hole (MP 7 on Trask River Rd up to Blue Ridge Creek) is closed to angling Sept. 1 - Nov. 30, and that 200 feet upstream and 900 feet downstream of Gold Creek at Trask Hatchery (which includes the Hatchery Hole) is closed to angling July 16 – Oct. 15.

Wilson River Fishing Report

Fall Chinook fishing opened on the Wilson River Sept. 16. With the recent rains, there are probably a few fish sneaking in. Bobber fishing bait, back-bouncing, back-trolling plugs or divers and bait, or casting spinners can all be effective methods. Anglers are reminded the Wilson River is closed to salmon angling Aug. 1 to Dec. 31, upstream of Jordan Creek (River Mile 21.9).

Summer steelhead fishing on the Wilson has been moderate to slow, but there are good numbers of fish throughout the system. Late August and September can be a great time to target these fish as cooler nights lower water temps, and fish that have been holding get more active. Target riffles and the top of pools during first and last light, and concentrate on deeper holding pools once the sun is on the water. Fishing stealthy, with light gear, and targeting first and last light is often the key to success with these fish.

Trout season opened May 22, and there are some cutthroat around, but fishing for them in the Wilson’s clear summer flows can be tough. Remember, the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8 inches.

Kilchis River Fishing Report

The Kilchis opened for fall Chinook on Aug. 1 and for catch and release chum salmon fishing on Sept. 16. It’s still a little early for both of these runs on the Kilchis, but with the recent rains there should be a few fish sneaking in. Bobber fishing bait, back-bouncing, back-trolling plugs or divers and bait, or casting spinners can all be effective methods. In addition Chum will hit jigs and flies if presented well.

Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Sea-run cutthroat should be entering the lower river now, too. Remember, the limit is two per day over 8-inches, and no bait is allowed through Aug. 31.

Illinois River Fishing Report

The Illinois River is now open for trout fishing. Since only hatchery trout may be retained, and hatchery trout are not likely to be to be found in the Illinois River at this time of year, fishing will be primarily catch-and-release for the native cutthroat trout.

Chetco River Fishing Report

Anglers will want to check current conditions of the Chetco Bar fire prior to fishing the Chetco River. Road closures are in effect for the majority of the watershed. Anglers may want to start trolling the bay as Chinook salmon start to nose into the estuary in September and early October.

Yaquina River Fishing Report

Chinook is open and with the rain early this week fishing is starting to pick up in tidewater. Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Remember, the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

Anglers are reminded the two-rod validation is only valid while angling in standing water bodies excluding coastal lakes with wild coho seasons. Two rods are prohibited on all coastal rivers, tidewater, estuaries and bays.

Nehalem River Fishing Report

There are fall Chinook being caught on Nehalem bay but the action has been sporadic thus far. The Nehalem River is open for Chinook, we haven’t heard many reports yet, but with the rain there should be a few fish sneaking into the river. In addition, hatchery coho should be showing up soon. Anglers are reminded that there is NO wild coho retention in the rivers and bays this year, and that two rods are prohibited on all coastal rivers, tidewater, estuaries and bays.

Notice: In water construction activities on the Miami Foley Road bridge at Foss, will be restricting boat access on the Nehalem River. Boaters going downstream from Roy Creek should use caution.

Trout season opened May 22, and there should be some nice cutthroat around. Remember the limit on streams and rivers is two per day over 8-inches.

Coos River Fishing Report

Largemouth bass fishing has been good in many of the area smaller lakes. Bluegills can be found in area lakes right along the weed lines.

Rainbow trout are scheduled to be stocked in Powers Pond, Bradley Lake, Butterfield Lake, Empire Lakes, and Saunders Lake during the month of October.
Streams and rivers are open to trout fishing until Oct. 31. Anglers are allowed to use bait in streams above tidewater starting Sept. 1. Anglers may harvest two trout per day that are a minimum of 8 inches long.

Anglers were catching Chinook salmon from the BLM boat ramp in the lower estuary up through the Coos River and South Fork Coos River. The bite was best a couple hours before the slack tides. A few wild coho have been caught lately. There is not a wild coho season inside Coos Bay this year so all wild coho must be released but anglers may keep an adipose fin-clipped hatchery coho. Salmon anglers are having the best luck trolling cut plug herring behind a flasher.

As of Monday, Sept. 18, fishing for lingcod, rockfish, cabezon, greenling or other bottomfish are closed because the quotas for several species have been reached. This includes the ocean along with bays and estuaries.

Crabbing continues to be good for those crabbing from a boat and from the docks in Charleston. Crabbing has been best near Charleston but legal crab can be caught all the way up the bay to the BLM boat ramp off of the North Spit. There was a mixture of hard and soft shelled legal Dungeness crab.

Recreational harvest of bay clams remains open along the entire Oregon coast. Clamming is excellent during low tides near Charleston, off Cape Arago Highway, and Clam Island. There are also good places to dig clams even on positive low tides in Coos Bay.

The recreational harvest of razor clams is CLOSED from Cascade Head to the California Border for elevated levels of domoic acid. This includes all beaches and all bays. Recreational harvesting of mussels is open along the entire Oregon coast. Before any shellfish harvest trip, make sure to check the Oregon Department of Agriculture website for any updates.

Coquille River Fishing Report

Streams and rivers are now open to trout fishing until Oct. 31. Anglers are allowed to use bait in streams above tidewater starting Sept. 1. Anglers may harvest 2 trout per day that are a minimum of 8 inches long.

Chinook salmon are being caught throughout the Coquille River. Most anglers are fishing the lower river from Riverton to the jetties. Salmon anglers are having the best luck trolling cut plug herring behind a flasher. There is no wild coho season in the Coquille River this year so all wild coho must be released but anglers may keep an adipose fin-clipped hatchery coho.

Smallmouth bass fishing has been good throughout the Coquille and South Fork Coquille rivers. Anglers are having success catching smallmouth bass on small spinners, crankbaits, jigs, and worms.

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